Manage Hindi Meaning 7 Workplace Safety Tips to Implement Today

Safe businesses are healthy businesses, so keeping your workplace safe is crucial to your team’s well-being as well as your productivity. Luckily, workplace safety isn’t rocket science. Here are 7 simple workplace safety tips that you can implement today.1. Check for slip/fall hazards. Falls are among the most common workplace injuries. They’re also among the easiest to prevent. Using nonslip mats on slippery areas is one simple solution. Another is ensuring steps or other potential trip hazards are clearly marked. Encouraging your team to wear appropriate footwear could also keep them safe.2. Keep fire exits clear. This may sound obvious, but all too often, the space in front of “unused” fire doors gets co-opted for storage. This is fine until that fateful day you actually need to get out through that door. So don’t fall for this temptation. Keep fire exits clear and clearly marked.


3. Implement regular housekeeping. Prevent stuff from occupying space it shouldn’t by regularly eliminating clutter. This means making a commitment to regular housekeeping. Make it a habit to quickly dispose of unneeded items, such as broken equipment or empty shipping boxes. Such objects often become trip hazards or fire hazards if allowed to accumulate. Setting up a regular cleaning schedule (which in some workplaces, can be a rotating chore list for team members) will ensure your workplace stays orderly.4. Promote a culture of safety. The most important factor in workplace safety is the human factor. Make sure your team knows you put safety first. Encourage commonsense safety practices, such as driving at sensible speeds.5. Cultivate a healthy workplace. Team members who go to work tired or sick may pride themselves on their grit, but dozing off while driving or operating heavy equipment properly can lead to serious accidents. Workplace health programs can teach your team easy self-care strategies while reducing your accident risk.6. Regularly inspect protective gear and personal equipment. Protective gear, such as welder’s goggles or safety harnesses, are your team’s first line of defense against workplace hazards. But even the best gear can wear out over time. Make sure everyone’s safety gear is regularly inspected. Also, don’t hesitate to replace any items that are past their prime. The safety of your team may depend on it.


7. Have written safety standards in place. Smart managers know nothing gets done if it’s not in writing. Make sure to put your safety standards in writing, and ensure everyone on your team is familiar with them. Written standards also remind your team that workplace safety should be a priority.Partnering with a Professional Employer Organization (PEO) is an easy way to ensure your team stays safe. By acting as your combined payroll and human resources department, a PEO company helps you develop practical workplace policies. It also ensures you’re in compliance with current OSHA regulations.

Fear This My Fellow Athlete

Competition is good, just as fear is good – if you will use it to your advantage rather than letting it use you. Fear can frazzle us to make mistakes, become uncertain, and anxious, but fear used to our advantage can propel us to greatness. It’s a double-edged sword. Since fear is internal, you own it, it’s yours to use as you will, if you ignore it, it might hurt you, if you use it, it can help you, give you the edge, especially in competition. How might I know this?

Well, I supposed any seasoned competitor in the human endeavor or athlete understands exactly what I am saying, but in case you need more examples to help you better understand this concept, by all means keep reading.

Recently, I read an interesting article online and watched a great video sponsored by Expert Sports Performance, the video was titled: “How Talented Athletes Deal with Fear,” by Loren Fogelman, a well-known sports psychologist.

In my view I believe that Fear is a wonderful thing, a huge driver of the human psyche, but Loren Fogelman reminds me of the truth that: “it motivates some and stops others dead in their tracks,” which is absolutely a fact.

Still, I believe that if FEAR stops someone from achieving or causes them to choke under pressure, then I would submit to you that:

1.) They don’t understand what fear is; and,
2.) They are not using FEAR as an adrenal shot for peak performance

Well, I say; too bad for them, if they are competing against me or my team. Fear can be a weakness if you let it, or high-octane when you need it, YOU decide which. “It’s all in your head” I always say. Anyway, that’s the way I see it. A great book to read is: “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway!” published by in the 80s as a motivational type book.

As a competitive runner, I used to imagine footsteps behind me and ready to pass. Interestingly enough, I was a pretty good athlete so that didn’t happen much, but when it actually did happen it’s a sound you never forget. This imagination during competitive races propelled me to stay on pace or increase my speed opening up a large gap between me and the other runners. Sometimes when I am out training even today, I will listen to my feet hit the trail and pick up the sounds of the echo and amplify them in my brain to simulate those ever-feared footsteps, thus, propelling me to run faster and faster.